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Friday, October 4, 2013

Hilton Hotel, Pune

By Marina Correa
Photography: Ritesh Ramaiah Photography; courtesy the architect


Level 12 at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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With a locally available material palette and minimum decorative elements, Japanese-based architectural firm M-style Inc. helmed by Ar. Masafumi Sanada tastefully articulates the interiors of DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel at Pune…

The Japanese architect brings his novel Japanese design sensibilities to the project and the design is based on simple Japanese elements interwoven with traditional Indian aesthetics. An elaborate spatial layout based on the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which is centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection of all things, is applied as the fulcrum around which the rest of the design elements are built.

3 Spices at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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Characteristics of the wabi-sabi aesthetic include asymmetryroughness or irregularity, simplicity, economy, austerity, modesty, intimacy and appreciation of the ingenuous integrity of natural objects and processes. The philosophy is clearly imbibed through the hotels’ 3 main eateries - 3 Spices, the all-day restaurant; Level12, a roof-top poolside lounge, and the Linear lounge and bar that sizzle with their subtlety and transparent, open décor.

3 Spices at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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3 Spices at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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For instance, the rows of racks that hold an assortment of bottles and jars filled with spices, herbs and condiments is definitely the attention-grabbing feature at 3 Spices, while the subdued flooring and wooden louvered partition acts in subtle contrast. 

Linear Bar at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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Linear Bar at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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Use of dark soft furnishing, veneers and natural flooring juxtaposed against spot and recessed lighting infuses a warm and cozy atmosphere at Linear Bar that is ideal for savouring single malts.


Level 12 at Hilton Hotel, Pune, India
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Likewise, with sweeping views of Pune city and the wide horizon beyond, the view from Level 12 is further accentuated by lots of empty spaces invoking a sense of transience and incompleteness, basking in the hotel’s central design philosophy – “nurture all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect.”

Where can one go wrong then? Anything and everything becomes undoubtedly acceptable.


5 comments :

  1. wow its beautifully designed ....especially the terrace lounge ...perfect for a candle light dinner :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. "I agree. The Architecture Firm I am with originally built their business on these cultural idiosyncrasies as they relate to the indigenous people of the United States. There are always variations from region to region, culture to culture, block by block in cities and across time in the location. Being attuned to these makes us better able to serve our clients, their communities, and the world at large. Plus, we are given a broader vocabulary in which to pull from for design." in response to IAnD's discussion thread - "Cultural idiosyncrasies in design can be well amalgamated and modulated to give rise to newer, unexplored design vocabularies. Agree?"

    ReplyDelete
  3. Me too with my practice in Solomon Islands, and teaching architecture in PNG. Used to "brand" this as "socially-sustainable architecture, being building design that people can relate to and want to look after.
    Bit of a mouthful the way the idea was posted though... in response to IAnD's discussion thread - "Cultural idiosyncrasies in design can be well amalgamated and modulated to give rise to newer, unexplored design vocabularies. Agree?"

    ReplyDelete
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