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Thursday, November 20, 2014

The Power of the Bend - Anisotropic Geometries

By Savitha Hira
Photography: Sumedh Prasad; courtesy Orproject
 
India Art n Design features Anisotropic Geometries by Ar. Rajat Sodhi
Geometries of the Bowl(left) & Vase (right)

Ar. Rajat Sodhi of Orproject applies anisotropic geometry to develop limited edition lifestyle accessories for Art d'Inox... 

Last week, we spoke of Computer Aided Technology and building design. Taking the conversation forward, we had an interesting chat with Ar. Rajat Sodhi, who is continually in research mode, developing his repertoire and skill set.
India Art n Design features Anisotropic Geometries by Ar. Rajat Sodhi
The Bowl

His research with distorted geometry and material strength led him to explore how the thinnest of surfaces could be made structurally stronger, when bent into form; and how force acts upon the bent form to test its tenacity at various points.  Playing with steel as a medium of his analysis, and capitalizing on its properties of elasticity and weightlessness, Rajat has used a ½ mm (half millimeter) thin steel sheet to arrive at two unique forms - a vase and a bowl.

India Art n Design features Anisotropic Geometries by Ar. Rajat Sodhi
Paper model(left) & Steel Proto (right)

As versatile with software codes, as he is with design, Rajat developed an algorithm based on the curvature of the surface and on developing several curved strips that could be notched together to build a sturdy form.  Once the paper model was finalized with the design morphed and calculated to digital perfection, the steel proto was actualized.
 
India Art n Design features Anisotropic Geometries by Ar. Rajat Sodhi
Geometries of the Vase

“Anisotropic material aggregations develop geometries, which form networks, surfaces and volumes based on single curved metal sheets,” explains Rajat. “Digitally calculated as material deformations of force-based vector fields, the morphologies create dense and open distributions of the steel strips that distort and form curved volumes. Both, the vase and bowl are made up of undulating layers of stainless steel, which meet and connect at varying intervals. This system creates a space-enclosing volume, which nestles around the core of the vase or the objects to be placed on the bowl. As a result, the opacities and translucencies of the objects deviate and generate continuously flowing geometries.”
 
India Art n Design features Anisotropic Geometries by Ar. Rajat Sodhi
Paper to Steel - near perfection!
Christened the Umami series (after the Japanese senses of smell and taste - vase and bowl), these limited edition prototypes could well be the start to envisaging large span structures as say, the roof of a building, touching a plane as the bowl does, at 3 different points; or the geometry of the vase could well be translated into the skin or fa├žade of a towering skyscraper! The added advantage here, as the creative designer explains, would be to regulate climatic conditions, as the vase, when viewed in one direction appears opaque, whilst in another, appears clear; translated into building design, this could offer North-South open spaces while restricting the generally lesser desirable East-West axis.

For more information / purchase of the Umami limited edition designer pieces, please write in to: info@orproject.com 

1 comment :

  1. Ryan Mathews, Futurist, author, philosopher, storyteller, scenario planner, strategist, artist and founder, Black Monk ConsultingNovember 22, 2014 at 12:52 PM

    Very interesting applications.

    ReplyDelete

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