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Friday, June 15, 2012

Artistic Oeuvres


By Chayanika Sen

Creative Recycled Furniture Designs
Photograph: Courtesy weurbanist.com

Creativity vs. waste has given birth to the new haute trash, an eclectic inclusion not only in one’s d├ęcor and accessorizing toolkit, but in design and architecture per se…

Recycling trash – whether plastic bottles, damaged CDs, discarded cloth articles, broken glass, crushed cans, tattered mattresses, old and battered trunks or suitcases… has always held a Bohemian charm, whether as offbeat and kitsch elements from an enterprising homemaker’s imagination, out-of-the-ordinary thinking by a designer, chiseling a chic eclectic style, making anew a whole room or parts thereof or as adaptive reuse architectural projects.

Door from Waste CD's
Photograph: Courtesy Footprints E.A.R.T.H 

Plastic Bottle wall
Photograph: Courtesy Footprints E.A.R.T.H 

Recycling has been periodically mentored and innovated upon in several new ways. Trend experts, trash-y designers and ecologists opine that reutilizing trash is actually a great eco-initiative. Not only does it mean better care of the environment but it also saves a lot of money. True, some of these designs can be way too quirky, but there are many people who love to have the edge in their designs, and recycling is the cheapest and greenest way to go!

Steel Desktop from Rusted Car Metal
Photograph: Courtesy environmentteam.com

Door from Scrap Metal
Photograph: Courtesy Footprints E.A.R.T.H
 

With some personal enterprise and some outside help, a few good examples of turning trash into useful products would be:

·         Assorted patchwork: Create a cloth collage from randomly sized and patterned pieces of cloth in a patchwork effect. The finished item can be used as couch covering, table cloths or just about any material to cover surfaces. Not only is it a great idea to fill your house with some clashing, eye-catching colours, but patchwork can be a great way to create completely new items to decorate your interiors.

Patchwork Upholstery
Photograph: Courtesy quiltspluscolor.blogspot.in

·         Recycled plastic and glass bottles: Flattened, glass bottles can make very eclectic server platters. They have also been extensively used via adaptive reuse in architecture

Glass Bottles for Walls
Photograph: Courtesy Footprints E.A.R.T.H

Recycled Vinyl Record Lamp
Photograph: Courtesy GIN Art Design

·         Discarded cartons, wooden crates and barrels etc make excellent seating arrangements catering to a rustic earthy ambience. They also make sturdy offbeat options for door panels, cabinet shutters, partitions and the like.

Furniture Made of Cargo Pellets and Pellet Collars
Photograph: Courtesy trashdesign.fi

·         And the list can go on... just like a fertile imagination waiting to be explored and tested.

Recycled T-Shirt Bag
Photograph: Courtesy greatgreengoods-com

Trendy Slippers from Fabric Leftovers
Photograph: Courtesy Diana Linda

From Nekchand’s garden at Chandigarh, which is a global synonym for ‘design from trash’, to home grown experimentation, the divide is filled with several options for trash accessories, furniture, fashion, etc., being explored and reinvented, consistently, refreshingly. What are you waiting for??

Wall Made from Electrical Wastes at Nekchand Garden Chandigarh
Photograph: Courtesy rashidfaridi.wordpress.com

26 comments :

  1. I celebrate the inventive and great imagination of the artist in India. The experts in what is call non biodegradable materials haven said that it takes 100's of years for some man made materials to integrate or fall a part. Therefore since we are not going to be around to see a plastic bottle disappear, as artist we shall take all man made material and instead of dumping it into mountain high piles, the best thing to do is Make Art out of Trash. Keep the good work, my friends artist in India and the whole world.

    ReplyDelete
  2. here in america we elect and recyle our "trash", and expect all the rest to be melted down and turned into statues of massive bulls on lower braodway.
    Posted by Mark Kruger on Linkedin Group: Architecture and Interiors in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  3. No I don't think it will effect the environment, however, it leaves room for an extended life on certain items. for the pleasure of the eye or at worst, a discussion on linkedin... Have you seen the documentary movie, Trash Warriors. It is all about architects in the Nevada desert (if I am not wrong) who build eco houses recycling almost everything. My only critisism is that 'recycle' art doesn't converse more than Man Ray's expressions. It is an art which is limited to its source. I don't denie nevertheless the dedication and the talent to creat the pieces.
    Posted by Hilaire O'Loughlin on Linkedin Group: ARCHITECT in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

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  4. i liked the gate and the lamps , thanks fr sharing :)

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  5. You might be interested in a web portal that has recently been launched called: www.co-oproduct.org

    This is a new open design portal which shows you how to make new desirable objects out of everyday packaging and household waste materials.

    Any feedback would be very much appreciated.

    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  6. Some of this stuff is really lovely, true, I think the use of florescent tubes to make a lampshade is particularly clever . . although potentially hazardous!

    It is important though that some thought goes into the environmental cost of processing the recycled content so that it is safe to use in its new life. Sometimes using recycled content can be more damaging to the environment than using new . .

    The problem is that's quite a difficult thing to work out isn't it. Are there quick tools for working out the enviromental impact of using waste?
    Posted by Matt Lyons on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi! There's a great challenge about that on http://www.openideo.com/open/e-waste/inspiration/ .

    "How can we manage e-waste & discarded electronics to safeguard human health & protect our environment?"

    It's a nice place to discuss that subject! I particularly liked the supermarket trolley chair :)
    Posted by Priscilla Alcalde Melo on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  8. There were some fanastic concepts from the 'Guangzhou Upcyling Competition' - using industrial waste in China to create new products, art pieces and designs. The winners used blue barrels to create simple hand tools http://www.bbc.co.uk/ukchina/simp/uk_education/2012/05/120520_edu_sinouk_upcycling_exhibition.shtml
    Posted by Sophie O'Kelly on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  9. These are great! I love how creative the designers were using all of the cast offs.
    Posted by Katherine Marle-Moberg on Linkedin Group: The Decoration Nation® - Connect. Build. Grow.

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  10. Uplifting stuff - there is something about this kind of work that just feels 'right'. Apart from the fact that the best of it would fit easily within a Vitra showroom.
    Posted by Jason Thorne on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm launching a online entity doing precisely that, had started with a couple disused Dualit toasters an converted them into lights. Working on a range of lighting designs base on motorcycle headlights. All the designs are based on 80% found or recycled material.
    Posted by Mario Pagano on Linkedin Group: Creative Design Professionals Worldwide in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Recycled newspaper and magazine ( mirror , wall ndecor, etc )
    Please visit : www.irmaengelen.com
    Thank you
    Posted by Irma Engelen on Linkedin Group: Creative Design Professionals Worldwide in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  13. Please visit a friend of mine in his Plastiquarium.
    David Edgar and his wife Robin do amazing fish sculptures from plastic bottles!
    http://www.plastiquarium.com/plastiquarium_gallery.html
    Posted by Elizabeth Heir on Linkedin Group: Creative Design Professionals Worldwide in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Very clever. Yes, repurposing and recycling can and will make a huge difference in the environment.
    Posted by Pam Faulkner on Linkedin Group: The Decoration Nation® - Connect. Build. Grow. in response to IAnD's discussion thread Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  15. I think it is wonderful to reuse thing as opposed to throwing them out. It also makes the case, in my opinion for heirloom pieces -- furniture that we pass down through families. The ideal of heirloom furniture seems gone from our culture except to a few regions. I think it is wonderful to find new uses for what used to be "trash."
    Posted by Gray Shelton on LinkedIn Group: The Decoration Nation® - Connect. Build. Grow.™ in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  16. I always saw a large part of my role as educating the next generation about environmnetal issues, in a way that was Fun, Engaging and Exciting.
    Please see - www.junk4funk.co.uk
    Posted by Victor Scott on LinkedIn Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Great stuff, I particularly liked the desk from the car bodies and the furniture from used pallets, these really seem to have real commercial potential.
    It's a good way of using whats around us but in a sense is a post-rationalisation of our overuse of resources and perhaps even an ironic comment on our current situation. Jason's comment about the Vitra showroom is interesting as the objects are more likely to be niche rater than mass market so it's effectiveness might be limited.
    As to making a difference to the environment I'm not sure, on a large scale one of the issues might be delivering the waste from where it is dispossed of to where it is required which is a common problem of all recycling. I'm sorry but, at the end of the day, it's about consuming (and wasting) less, buying what you need and using it well.
    Posted by Stephen Anderson on LinkedIn Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  18. As I already alluded to, junk4funk has precisely served the role of educating the next generation about, to quote the above comment, "..consuming (and wasting) less.."

    It is a pity that junk4funk's involvement in the activities allied to the Olympic Games has been almost nil.
    Posted by Victor Scott on LinkedIn Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Has anyone seen recycling done well, or at all, in a retail environment?
    Posted by Sigrid Brewka-Steeves on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Vintage clothing stores come to mind, again the product has to be of a good quality, fulfill consumers needs and used well.
    Posted by Stephen Anderson on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Cyndi Rhodes does some great things at "Worn Again".
    Posted by Victor Scott on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  22. There is a musician that was living around Puerto Aventuras MX on an island he made of 2 liter plastic sofa bottles. It was pretty much self contained. Had dirt, grass, chickens, a goat & he grew vegetables. He collected rain water & had a working shower.
    Posted by Elite Furniture Gallery on Linkedin Group: The Decoration Nation® - Connect. Build. Grow.in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  23. It's a nice idea but in reality only prolongs the life of a limited number of materials whilst consuming and then embedding additional
    energy into the loop of manufacture. Having said that, large scale repurposing of materials has been going on for centuries (e.g. Metals and textile materials such as mungo and shoddy) but the embed of energy is problematic irrespective of the ability to make money from recycling and repurposing. Much better to design with greater sustainablility in mind in the first place to prolong use considering issues such as resource sensitivity, material economy, etc.
    Posted by Philip Brook on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Very interesting projects. It is very important to motivate people to make their own things from trash, this could make everybody rethink product's lifecycle.
    Posted by Paris Selinas on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  25. I agree with Phillip, getting to grips with the whole product life cycle is far more important than cooing over the eco merits of some incidental object d'art
    Posted by Bruce Renfrew on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Bruce and Phillip are right: Design for sustainability is something that can have a direct environmental impact. But this can go hand by hand with design from trash. Not from incidental objects d' art may be (which are fancy but with a poor impact usually), but from motivating people to create things from waste materials. This might not have a huge direct environmental impact but in the long run people learn to think in a different way. So, there is value in terms of behaviour change and education. Plus that cultivates creativity and imagination too. I find these toys amazing: http://mymakedo.com/
    Posted by Paris Selinas on Linkedin Group: Design Council in response to IAnD's discussion thread:Can design from trash – the mantra of reuse and recycle – actually make a difference to the environment?

    ReplyDelete

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